Georgia Department of Behavioral Health & Developmental Disabilities
Frank Berry, Commissioner
2 Peachtree Street NW
Atlanta, GA 30303

Georgia Crisis &
Access Line
(GCAL)
1-800-715-4225 www.mygcal.com


January 22, 2014

DBHDD Impact

Press Conference: Georgia to host National Rx Drug Abuse Summit in April

WHEN: Thursday, January 23rd, 12:00 pm
WHERE: Georgia State Capitol, North Wing 206 Washington Street, SW Atlanta, Georgia 30334

On Thursday, Commissioner Berry will serve as Master of Ceremonies for a press conference announcing the 2014 National Rx Drug Abuse Summit to be held April 22nd-24th at the Atlanta Marriott Marquis.

According to its website, the Summit is the largest national collaboration of professionals from local, state and federal agencies, business, academia, clinicians, treatment providers, counselors, educators, state and national leaders, and advocates impacted by Rx drug abuse.

The press conference will feature Governor Nathan Deal; Attorney General Sam Olens; U.S. Representative Hal Rogers, Chair, House Committee on Appropriations; Dr. Tom Frieden, Director, Center for Disease Control and Prevention; and Earl Gohl, Co-Chair, Appalachian Regional Commission.

For more information, contact press@dbhdd.ga.gov.

Budget Presentation

Commissioner Berry

Commissioner Berry presents DBHDD's amended budget for fiscal year 2014 to the Joint Appropriations Health and Human Services Subcommittee (January 16, 2014).

What is a CSB?

In 1993, the Georgia General Assembly created the community service board (CSB) system to function as the stateís public safety net for behavioral health and developmental disability services. CSBs are instrumentalities of state government and provide services via contract with the Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD). Georgiaís CSB system is made up of 26 agencies that deliver services across the state.

Nearly $300 million is invested annually into the CSB system to deliver core services as well as services required by a settlement agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ). In 2010, the State of Georgia entered into the Americans Disabilities Act (ADA) Settlement Agreement with the DOJ. This agreement represents a 5-year plan to transition from an institutional model of health care delivery to a community-based system. The departmentís partnership with the CSBs is a key component of efforts to meet the terms of the settlement agreement and to expand community-based services across Georgia.

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